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BIO Coffee Talks: October 2018

Who: Hui Shen

Bedford Institute of Oceanography

What: On Detecting Possible Habitats of the North Atlantic Right Whale

We focus on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARWs) and their habitat areas in Canadian waters, using high resolution (down to 1 m) satellite remote sensing data to capture different scales of ocean dynamics. Mesoscale dynamical features, including eddies, internal waves and fronts, are found to be ubiquitous in all of the presently defined NARW habitat areas. These features, together with the general ocean circulation, which horizontally exchanges water masses, provide notable vertical momentum to particles in the water column, which can be important for nutrients, copepods and larvae to locate in these coastal areas. Spatial patterns and temporal distributions of these mesoscale dynamics features are obtained from satellite observations. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nutrient supply chains for the local ecosystem. Earlier studies at BIO in related fields will be linked to estimate the potential contribution of these mesoscale dynamical processes to the overall nutrient input.

When: Friday, October 26, 2018

Where: 10am, Needler Boardroom, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


Who: Andrew MacDougall

Climate and Environment, St. Francis Xavier University

What: The Oceanic Origin of Carbon Budgets

One of the major advances in climate science in the past decade has been the realization that change in global temperature is directly proportional to total cumulative CO2 emissions, independent of historical emissions or current emission rate. This finding has led to the definition of a 'Carbon Budget' — a finite quantity of fossil fuels that can be burnt whilst holding warming below a given temperature level, such as the 1.5 and 2.0°C temperature limits specified in the Paris Agreement.

In this talk I will present my recent research on the theoretical foundations of carbon budgets, which traces their origin to ocean carbonate chemistry, and ocean heat uptake. I will also present some recent applications of carbon budgets including: estimating the fraction of known fossil fuel reserves that can be burnt, attribute historical responsibility for climate change, and to scrutinize national emissions commitments towards meeting the Paris Agreement goal.

When: Friday, October 12, 2018

Where: 10am, Needler Boardroom, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


Who: Zoe Finkel

Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University

What: The Oceanic Origin of Carbon Budgets

When: Friday, October 5, 2018

Where: 10am, Needler Boardroom, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


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Last Modified: 2018-10-31