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BIO Coffee Talks: March 2018

Who: Xiaohan Liu

Marine Ecosystem Science, Ocean and Ecosystem Science Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

What: Remote sensing of Phytoplankton Size Class and Functional Type

Phytoplankton Size Class (PSC) and Functional Type (PFT) are linked to ecological and biogeochemical changes in the oceanic environment. Satellite-based remote sensing of ocean colour provides unique observational capability to biological oceanographers and other Earth observation scientists interested in processes that involve phytoplankton. Here, we provide a review of current approaches for PSC retrieval from space, and evaluate the performance of nine PSC models in the coastal area of the Northwest Atlantic (NWA) using phytoplankton pigment measurements and coincidental satellite data. The model with the best performance was applied to the time-series of the Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI) archive for the NWA. In addition, some updates on ongoing work of PFT algorithm development are also presented.

When: Friday, March 2, 2018

Where: 10am, George Needler Boardroom, Room VS-427, van Steenburgh Building, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


Who: Shiliang Shan

NSERC visiting fellow BIO/DFO

What: Applications of ocean circulation and Lagrangian particle tracking models from coastal to basin scale

Particle tracking modelling methods in ocean circulation simulation represent a major frontier in interdisciplinary oceanography. Over the past few years, I have developed several ocean circulation and particle tracking models ranging from coastal scale (10 km) to basin scale (10^3 km). In this presentation, I will introduce key concepts of particle tracking modelling method. Then I will present three diverse realistic applications: (1) hydrodynamic connectivity in Halifax Harbour, (2) residence time in Sable Gully MPA, and (3) migration of adult eels from the coast to Sargasso Sea in the North Atlantic. I will also discuss two ongoing projects on the shelf-slope water exchange on the Scotian Shelf and the drifter dispersion in the Kitimat Fjord, British Columbia.

When: Friday, March 9, 2018

Where: 10am, George Needler Boardroom, Room VS-427, van Steenburgh Building, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


Who: Rick Danielson

DAO, Inc.

What: Shared true variance among in situ, satellite, and gridded ocean products

Calibration and validation of geophysical data often employs, for practical purposes, a reference dataset that is familiar, with error bounds defined by ordinary and reverse least squares regression. For a unique solution between these bounds, Stoffelen (1998) proposed the use of a third dataset. Triple collocation has thus provided a sophisticated approach to geophysical calibration/validation (cal/val) for the past twenty years. We introduce a new statistical model, called INFERS, that has evolved out of recent studies of the triple collocation model. INFERS may be one of the first regression models to diagnose error correlations, but once such contributions are accommodated, it is shared true variance (rather than error) that seems to provide a measure of agreement between, say, a well-chosen in situ dataset and a set of competing gridded products. Examples of global ocean surface current and heat flux analyses are provided.

When: Friday, March 16, 2018

Where: 10am, George Needler Boardroom, Room VS-427, van Steenburgh Building, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


Who: John Smith

Bedford Institute of Oceanography

What: Tracer transport through the "Arctic Loop" and the Labrador Sea into the deep North Atlantic off Bermuda: flow properties along the "global conveyer belt"

The long lived, conservative tracer, 129I is discharged from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in France and the UK and transported into the Arctic Ocean where it circulates on time scales of 10-30 y before re-entering the Nordic Seas, descending to the bottom of the Labrador Sea and flowing southward along the continental slope in the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) that ventilates the abyssal depths of the North Atlantic. Synchronous time series measurements of 129I and ventilation tracers (CFC, SF6) in the Arctic Ocean (notably on 2015 GEOTRACES cruises) and in the North Atlantic on Line W (Cape Cod to Bermuda) have been modelled using "transit time distribution (TTD)" techniques to resolve flow velocity and mixing time scales in the respective regimes. Among other issues, this study addresses the importance of mixing in the sequestering of anthropogenic carbon in the Arctic Ocean and the presence of interior pathways in the western basin of the North Atlantic for the equatorward flow of high latitude tracers that bypass boundary current pathways, as predicted by model simulations and float studies.

When: Friday, March 23, 2018

Where: 10am, George Needler Boardroom, Room VS-427, van Steenburgh Building, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia


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Last Modified: 2018-05-03